Plantar Fasciitis Treatment

A study conducted by Luca M. Sconfienza, M.D., of the University of Genoa in Italy focused on a relatively new treatment option combines steroid injections and ultrasound waves. This form of treatment was found to be 95% effective in plantar fasciitis patients in the study.

The plantar fascia is a connective tissue that stretches the bottom length of your foot from the heel. The condition of plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of this connective band, known for causing discomfort and pain while standing or walking. Although the condition can be treated, conservative methods may take up to a year before they become effective.

Conventional treatments include certain exercises, night splints, arch support, staying off your feet and overall rest. Previously the cure for plantar fasciitis was shockwave therapy, which directs sound waves to the area where pain is being experienced. Despite the treatment’s success it is considered painful and requires several sessions before any notable results occur. It is also fairly expensive and does not cure the pain for every plantar fasciitis patient.

Dr. Sconfienza examined the effects of a new technique that combined ultrasound-based methods similar to shockwave therapy, applying a steroid injection directly to the plantar fascia. This form of treatment is a one-time outpatient procedure that involves a small dose of local anesthesia. A needle punctures the affected area and causes a nominal amount of bleeding that assists the fascia in healing. This technique is known as dry-needling.

Dr. Sconfienza found that 42 of the 44 patients that were involved in the new procedure had their symptoms disappear completely within a three week timespan, including pain. “This therapy is quicker, easier, less painful, and less expensive than shockwave therapy,” Dr. Sconfienza said. “In cases of mild plantar fasciitis, patients should first try non-invasive solutions before any other treatments. But when pain becomes annoying and affects the activities of daily living, dry-needling with steroid injection is a viable option.”